Experiential Sensory Prayer – Part 2 – Creating a Prayer Room for church and community use

A couple of years ago I spent a few unexpected weeks in a non-English speaking hospital in Germany after emergency surgery while on holiday.  It was a difficult and frightening time. Once I was able to walk, one of the staff showed me the little prayer room near my ward. Every evening, as the hospital quietened down for the night, I would go and sit in there for an hour before turning out my light and going to sleep.  It was a quiet, peaceful place. The walls were draped in a light yellow sheer fabric, the seats were comfortable, the lighting was dimmed, there were a couple of peaceful paintings on the wall, a wooden cross, and a Bible. Simple. Peaceful. Restful. Inviting. In the silence of every evening I sat there and talked to God. I was constantly in prayer during those days, but the quiet hour spent in a room set apart especially for such communion was particularly precious. In my mind I still go back into that room. It was a safe place and God met me there. (As an aside, I remember even then, when I really wasn’t very well, thinking about how much better it could have been if there were some interactive things in the room to help people pray.)

Hospitals often have prayer rooms, places where family and friends as well as patients can find some solace and comfort. These spaces are most often interfaith and they get used by both the faithful believer and those who wouldn’t call themselves religious. At times of trial, even those who do not claim to have a faith turn to God or a higher being for help and comfort. It’s less typical to find a similar prayer room in a church building. Churches generally focus on their meeting place as the central space for prayer. The purpose of the meeting space is to encourage meeting with God in a corporate way. Sometimes there’s a back room where the clergy and lay people might meet for a prayer meeting or prayer before a worship service.  But a small prayer room isn’t a typical space. I think it’s worth putting some effort into making one, no matter what style of corporate worship you enjoy.

We worked for a few years in a church which had an old chapel styled building with several small side rooms. My role was to work with the community and find ways to connect the community into the church.  We had a lot of different groups coming in and out of our buildings and so we turned one of the small rooms into a multi-sensory prayer room.  It was really interesting seeing how the room was used. Many of the church going regulars had keys to the church and would come in and use the room during the week. Other church going regulars would use it on a Sunday morning, before or after their worship service. It intrigued me to see the different responses the church going regulars had to the room. For some it was a highlight of their worship experience, and they enjoyed the quiet stillness the space afforded, for others, it was an unneccessary use of the room when there was already a lovely chapel in which to pray. Some enjoyed the hands-on approach and loved to take advantage of the tactile prayers, while others would tidy up what they perceived as mess.

What intrigued me even more was the reaction to the room by different people from the community who were in and out of the building for all kinds of classes and events, both church based and community based.  In particular our church run weekly preschool music and movement group had adults and kids regularly using the prayer room.  There were queues some mornings as people stopped in for their little weekly communion with God. This was by far more exciting to me than the use of the room by the regular churchgoers. This non-threatening space gave people a chance to interact at their own pace and level. There wasn’t anyone watching them. It was comfortable and safe. They didn’t have to act in a certain way or say a particular set of words. There was no church culture that they had to step into and imitate. It was a comfortable space in which they could be themselves. They could talk to their children about faith and experience something of God together. I’d never really know who was using it from day to day, but every so often someone would stop and chat to me about something they’d experienced as they sat or knelt or stood in the room and prayed.  God was at work in their lives.

So here’s some ideas for setting up a prayer room or space within your church building.

The Space

  1. The Room – Do you have a small room in your existing space you could repurpose as a prayer room? If you don’t have a room, you could set up a space using screens to create a defined area.
  2. Remove the clutter – Take everything out of the space. Churches are often the recipients of unwanted large furniture items and these items usually find their way into small seldom used rooms. Be a little ruthless. Find somewhere else for the excess furniture to sit, or even consider getting rid of it!
  3. Lighten the walls – White paint! With a bit of elbow grease and some basic white paint, you can brighten up a room quickly and cheaply. Paint the walls, ceilings and doors plain white. It’s light and you can then add in fabric and props as required for your various prayers.
  4. Seating – You may want to be flexible with your seating in your room and change it according to the types of prayers you have displayed. Different people will respond in different ways to the space. Some will pass through quickly and will only want to stand, while others will want to spend some time in the space so will prefer to sit. Depending on the needs of your potential prayer room users, may determined what kind of seating you supply. Whether floor cushions, bean bags, a rocking chair, an armchair or a wooden stool, the style of your seating and the position of it in the room will set the tone and provide an indication on how you expect people to interact in the space.
  5. Small tables – Use several smaller tables to arrange your prayers. Think about the height of the prayers and match the furniture to the type of prayer. Do you want participants to stand, kneel, sit? Rather than having fixed furniture, change it around depending on the prayers you’re using.
  6. Lighting – You may want to change this around depending on your prayers, but try to create soft lighting by using a lamp, fairy lights or battery candles. Make it easy for yourself and for those who will be using the room. Having all the lights plugged into a multi power box means there is only one switch your prayer room visitor may need to turn on when they enter and exit.
  7. Heating – If the room is likely to be cold, add in a small heater so that your participants can feel warm and cosy when they’re praying. Choose a heater which will have an automatic switch to turn off if left on too long. Alternatively, get the person who unlocks and locks up the building each day to turn the heater on and off.
  8. Draperies and wall coverings – You may want to use the walls to display visual image or  instructions for the prayers. You could also have sheer draped curtains or fabric which could be put up or pulled down depending on the prayers. The softness of the fabric helps soften the room and creates a softer feeling for the participant. Add a couple of cuddly throws or blankets. This gives an added sense of security and warmth to the room.
  9. Practical instructions – Tactile prayers are messy. Whether you’re picking up stones and putting them in water, cutting up small pieces of paper, peeling mandarins or pressing paper flags into a sand saucer, there is potential for mess. Have a general instruction to leave the room ready for the next person. You may want more specific instructions related to each prayer.

The Prayers

  1. Think in themes – I like to group three to five prayers together by theme. Generally this is related to seasons, both calendar and church calendar. Prayers on Spring, Autumn, Winter and Spring provide metaphors to build from in spiritual lives. The church calendar seasons of Lent, Easter, Pentecost and Advent all lend themselves to themed stations. Other themes could be topical; Elections, natural disasters, local social issues.
  2. Think across the senses – Use the five senses of sight, sound, smell, taste and feel when you plan your prayers. What physical ideas can you incorporate into your prayers? The use of the senses helps ground the prayers, taking the ordinary and connecting it to the sacred.
  3. Think in faith stages – The room will be used by a variety of different people who will be operating at varying levels of faith and understanding. Provide a range of starting points, so that someone new to the faith or even pre-faith can pray but also that someone who has a long faithful heritage can also pray. I’ve generally found, if you keep it simple, those who want to make their prayer more complex will do so, but if you make your prayer instructions too complicated, it just doesn’t get used.
  4. Think across developmental ages & stages – What appears interesting to a five year old, may not appeal to a fifty-five year old. Different people have different skills in physical manipulation. Include prayers which are easy to use. Simple prayers like placing a stone in a bowl is accessible to everyone whether old or young.
  5. Think of different types of prayer – I like to group my prayers by the following types and when I plan my prayer room content I select two or three types of prayer, with one prayer based on each type or on some occasions I’ll make the Prayer Room totally Intercession or Confession prayers.
    • Praise and thanksgiving
    • Petition and supplication
    • Confession
    • Intercession
    • Responsive
  6. Think of equipment – Go through the exercise of praying all of the prayers yourself in the room to make sure your equipment works. Do you need to add extra things such as paper towels or a basin of water, a small brush and shovel to sweep up bits, newspaper on the floor, a rubbish bin? All these practical details make the prayer room able to be used and reused.
  7. Think of instructions – Keep your instructions to the minimum reading required. Less is more. But usually instructions are required in some form. If you can put some of your instructions in visual form; photos showing the various steps, diagrams or cartoons, speech bubbles with each step.
  8. Think of the space and the people – Some people will want to stand to pray. They’ll want to have their flight plan in place in case they want to leave the room quickly. Others will feel more comfortable seated and will intend to stay for a while. Getting the space right takes some time. This is about knowing those who will use your prayer room and how they might interact with it. There’s a balance between creating a private space and not a trapped space. Experiment with the space and get feedback from a variety of people. Remember that there’ll be a mixture of reactions and no one perfect way to set up your room.

25 Stockings to Christmas – Community Fundraiser

Fundraiser Design Sign UpSign up your group, church or organisation for the “25 Stockings to Christmas” fundraiser on offer this year.   Minimum order of 10 copies.  You sell the books at $6.50 each and keep $2 for each book sold.  The book retails at $7.25 each so your buyers also get a saving.  Prices are all in NZD.

Light in the Darkness

Our family is using the 25 Stockings book each night at the dinner table.  As well as three versions of homemade ’25 Stockings’ hanging across the room, our 19 year old daughter bought an Advent candle this year. It’s one of those candles with incremental marks down it from 1 – 25.  So each night when we are all together we light the candle as we eat our dinner.  This requires very careful watching because although the candle starts off burning slowly, all of a sudden the wax drips down the side and the mark is reached for the day and it’s time to blow out the candle.

Once we’ve finished eating we read the bible passage. Because our children have always had this experience (I started writing the book when I was 19!) they love the three questions so we have to include that, and then we usually read the reflection and the prayer.

A couple of nights ago we also did the Discussion Time talking about darkness and times when we’ve been in the dark and turned on a light and how this makes a difference and of course how this relates to the metaphor of God’s love.  We had a satisfying conversation about light and darkness and times we’ve each felt God’s presence.   It was nice sitting there in front of a candle and talking about the impact of light that a single candle creates in a darkened room.

Last night I wasn’t feeling so good and although I went to bed early, I was up and down all night.  At first the rest of the family were still all up so while my room was in darkness, the rest of the house was a blaze of light.  By about midnight, 17’s door was shut and I figured he had turned in for the night. But sometime after 1, when I was up again and the rest of the house was this time in darkness too, I reasonably thought everyone else had now gone to bed.  But… around 17’s closed door was a silhouette of light.  (Not that, there was anything wrong with him still being up – he is on holiday)

I was pondering the idea that I had only seen the light around his door because the rest of the house was in darkness.  It was kind of the opposite thinking of our earlier discussion talking about darkness and the difference that happens when a candle is lit.  (Okay, I know it sounds like the same thing but bear with me.)  The light had been on all the time, but I only saw that it was on when the rest of the house changed from light to dark.

So maybe sometimes the metaphor is that we can be like a light in the darkness for others just like a candle lighting up the darkness.  And maybe other times we are part of a larger group of lights, indistinguishable as individuals until we are separated and stand as a solitary light in darkness.

I’ve really liked the metaphor as a follower of Jesus, of being a light in the darkness, or being salt adding flavour to the world.  But I also think there is a balance and when we are being ‘light’ we carry on being true to our call to follow Jesus and be light to the world, by both gathering with a larger group of other ‘lights’ and also living, working and spending time on our own with others who are not followers of Jesus, and therefore hopefully bringing light to their darkness.

It’s a balance that is a struggle and maybe always changing.  There is something wonderful and refreshing for followers to spend large amounts of time with other followers of Jesus.  And maybe at different times in our lives we need this fellowship more than other times.   But if we spend all of our time with our friends from our church groups, then how much is our light shining noticeably to others?  And if we spend too much time with others who are not followers of Jesus, are we in danger of our light ‘battery’ running out or our candle burning until the flame is extinguished.

Anyway, that was my middle of the night musing… instead of sleeping!  Just thought I’d share it.

Advent is coming… have you got your 25 Stockings ready?

I have just discovered that The Warehouse has a set of 25 Christmas Advent Stockings in Red and White for $20.  These would go fabulously with our 25 Stockings to Christmas book.

http://www.thewarehouse.co.nz/red/catalog/product/Christmas-Classics-Advent-Fill-Your-Own-Stockings?SKU=1876109

(Photo credit: my own no-sew version of 25 stockings – instructions available through Kereru Club)

Shrove Tuesday Pancakes

This is my very simple NUMBER ONE pancake recipe.  It includes 1 cup of flour, 1 teaspoon of baking powder, 1 egg and 1 cup of milk.  (1+1+1+1).  Of course the traditional Shrove Tuesday pancake remembrance was a time to use up all the fat and decadent ingredients in the house… and my pancakes don’t have sugar or butter included… so the trick is to go to town on the toppings!  Shrove Tuesday is not a holiday traditionally celebrated in NZ (by Kiwis), although these days some churches and Christian groups are celebrating with pancake breakfasts or suppers.  Andrew and I have been holding Shrove Tuesday events for over 20 years.  Initially we hosted them at our local McDonalds which was 50m away from our church.  It was a fundraiser for mission and people would stop by on their way to school and work.  At our next church we held Pancake Breakfasts in our home and again, people would stop by before heading off.  But these days with our Avenues Congregation as everyone is spread far and wide, we hold a Pancake Dessert evening.   Everyone brings along a topping, we have a few stations spread around, and we feast on pancakes before Lent begins.

To make these pancakes mix all the ingredients together and beat until you’ve made a smooth batter.  Heat a non-stick frypan until super hot and then reduce heat.  Pour a small circle of batter into the middle and then circle the frypan to spread the pancake.  When small air bubbles appear and pop, turn your pancake over.    Decorate with fruit, cream, syrups of your choice.

The best thing about my photographed pancake is that the blackberries, raspberries, strawberry and (3) of the blueberries came from my own garden!  I drizzled the fruit with maple syrup.   Of course in the Southern Hemisphere our Shrove Tuesday occurs in late Summer or early Autumn… and we have an abundance of fresh fruit.  My favourite winter pancakes is to add some chocolate chips into the batter and make a sweet and hot blueberry sauce to pour on top.

(Photo credit:  my pancake with homegrown berries from my garden)

Prayer Stations at Kohekohe Church

Our first Refreshment at the Station book has just been published so I thought it timely to reflect on our recent Church event on Sunday with our Avenues Church.  We just held our annual Avenues Prayer and Pizza event at this beautiful little historic church on Awhitu Peninsula in Auckland.  It’s an idyllic setting and one of a handful of times our Church family meets in a church building during the year. It’s also one of the very few times we have a front for our meeting!  Our prayer event includes some responsive prayers led from the front and then a dozen stations that participants can move around at their leisure, followed with a guitar prayer and some final responsive prayers.

It is fascinating how everyone approaches the stations differently.  We provide plenty of room for people to make their own choices… and if taking part in the stations isn’t someone’s cup of tea there is an alternative reflection provided – with an amazing view to look out upon to aid in the reflection.

There are those that breeze through the stations quickly and others who only manage to fit in a third of the stations in the time provided.  Some of our regulars are very ‘Station Savvy’ and explore in great detail faith questions at each station, while at this event we also had some newcomers who hadn’t experienced Station worship before and enjoyed the different way of coming to worship. As usual there was a mixture of engagement and time spent at different stations.

It’s been ages since Andrew and I have gone around Stations together.  When our kids were little, it was one child each, or if there were visitors we’d usually split to make sure everyone was comfortable.  These days visitors are scooped up by our regulars and so on this Sunday we went around together.   Another thing which always surprises me about stations is my own reaction to them.  By the time I’ve planned the service, written the stations, gathered the bits and pieces… it is delightful to me that i still discover new things when I move around the stations.  Perhaps it’s the opportunity to interact with others, or the time and space to pause and reflect… whatever it is – it’s powerful and moving and very faith refreshing!   The whole idea of refreshment at the station really rang true for me this last Sunday!

Of course the senses were fully engaged at this event!  I’m a bit of a foodie too – and the additional part of the day with pizzas cooked on an outdoor pizza oven further down the peninsula at Graham’s Beach really made it all very special, refreshing, relaxing and invigorating.

There is a book coming of course on Five Senses to Prayer.  It’s been about 10 years in the writing!  I just need to get organised and get into some serious organising of all the material!

The great thing about writing this kind of book as an e-book is that it will be filled with cross referenced hyperlinks – so you can navigate around it to find prayers that suit your worship event.   To be amongst the first to hear about it make sure you join our Kereru Club and/or like us on www.facebook.com/Kereru.Publishing

To see more photos of our Prayer and Pizza event you can find them on the Avenues facebook page www.facebook.com/AvenuesChurch and the Avenues website www.avenues.org.nz has some older photos from previous events too.